4-H Home Environment

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1. There are 27 classes in the Home Environment Division.  A county may submit one entry per class.  A member may enter up to two classes within ONE of the Units I—Advanced and one class in Changing Spaces in the Home Environment Division.  (This means: a member’s name could appear a total of three times in Home Environment--up to two times in ONE of the “units” and one time in “Changing Spaces” on the county’s Home Environment Division invoice sheet.)
2. See General Rules applying to all 4-H exhibitors and general rules applying to all 4-H exhibits except livestock listed previously in this catalog.
3. The work on the entry must be done by the 4-H member since the previous year’s State Fair. 
4. Exhibit must be in the unit in which the 4-Her is enrolled.
5. A winner will be selected for each category. 
6. Each exhibit must be properly labeled. Place ID tag (4LO-11SO) in the most visible place on the exhibit, preferably on the lower right-hand corner.  Labels may be securely taped, attached with a rubber band through a hole in the corner or safety pinned (fabric items).  Do NOT use straight pins.  To insure that all parts of the exhibit make it back to the county, “hide” a small label (with a minimum of the county name) on EVERY part that might become separated from others; these should not be visible to the public when displayed.
7. Several classes require documentation. Write the member’s name, county, and class number on the front of the sheet, folder or notebook of documentation.
8. Only those entries that are properly labeled and documented will be considered for class champion. 
9. Wall hangings and bulletin boards must be ready to hang with appropriate hardware attached.
10. Refinished item refers to an item already in use which has been given a new finish using paint or some type of seal.
11. 4-H Home Furnishings entries may be made in the following classes:

 

Unit I EXHIBITS from Exploring Your Home project book
887 Color Collage - (pp. 7-8, activity 3.)  Mount collage on mat board or foam core board. (Must be ready to hang with appropriate hardware attached)
888 Texture Collage or Rubbing - (pp. 8-9, choose either Activity 1 or 2). Mount collage or rubbing on mat board or foam core board. (Must be ready to hang with appropriate hardware attached)
889 Transparent finish applied to small wood object. (pp. 13-14)  Apply a clear finish such as tung oil, penetrating seal or polyurethane which does not include stain to a small wood object such as a bowl, tray, cutting board, board game or box. A transparent finish allows the wood grain to show through.  Judging emphasis will be on how well the object is prepared for the finish and how well the finish has been applied, not the construction of the wood object.  The wood object may be made by the member, made by someone else, purchased or found. Items that are stained or finished with paint do not fit in this class. 
890 Simple cloth item for the home (Sewing machine may be used but is not required) Examples: decorative pillow, tablecloth, laundry bag, place mats; draped valance with accompanying photo showing end result; footstool with a seat made of woven fabric; fabric applied to an item such as a box, plate, or lampshade. Unacceptable: purses, tote bags, backpacks, duffle bags.
891 Wastebasket – (pp. 10-12) decorated by member
892 Bulletin board (must be ready to hang with appropriate hardware attached)

 

Unit II EXHIBITS from Living with Others project book
893 Decorative item for the home—created by the member as part of a 4-H Home Environment Project. 
894 Simple wood item refinished by the 4-H member (pp. 14-15) - Item should have straight lines with no elaborate carvings or turnings.  (The idea is to learn how to apply a new finish such as paint, stain, varnish, polyurethane, etc. to a simple wooden furnishing that’s already in use.)  Documentation is to include a “before” photo with explanation of how the item was refinished must be securely attached.  Examples: refinished footstool, children's furniture, small box, tray, picture frame, bookshelves, and plant stand.
895  Cloth item for the home created using a sewing machine (Unit II, p. 12-14) – Examples: hemmed tablecloth or table runner, wall hanging, pillow, pillow case, throw, embellished towels, shower curtain, chair cover, laundry bag, pet bed, valence, and curtains. Unacceptable: purses, tote bags, backpacks, duffle bags.
896 Invitation and thank you letter/note—Design an invitation and thank you letter/note for a sleepover, birthday party or other occasion of your choice. (p. 6-7) Cards/letters may be created with computer software or handwritten. Decorations on the cards/letters may be member’s original artwork, computer-generated art, purchased or found decorative items. The message written in the card or letter is more important than the decorations.  Write your name and county on the back of each card/letter and place each card/letter in a plastic sheet protector.  (For the fair, it is best to use a fictitious address and contact information on the invitation or thank you.)

 

Unit III EXHIBITS from Where I Live project book
897 Accessory for the home created by the 4-H member - This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) the accessory and 2) a sheet or folder of documentation.  Documentation is to include: a sketch or photo to show how the accessory is used in the home and a description of how the design and colors fit in with the other furnishings and color used in the home.  Examples: stitchery or appliqué wall hanging, latch hook items, pillow with applied design (stitchery, appliqué or other media), rug, picture in appropriate frame and ready to hang. 
898 Table setting - This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) the table setting and 2) a color photo or diagram of the table setting showing how it should be arranged.  Include centerpiece, plate, beverage container(s) and table linen appropriate to theme or event chosen by 4-H member (pp. 11-13). Flatware (knife, fork and spoon) must be included in the photo/diagram showing how all the items are arranged, but do NOT send flatware to the state fair.  Individual items included in the table setting may be made by but are not required to be made by the 4-H'er.  To ensure that all pieces get returned to the member, write the name and county of the exhibitor on tape and place it on every part of the table setting in a location hidden to the public when exhibited at the fair. 
899 Piece of furniture refinished (stripped, sanded, and painted or stained/sealed) by the 4-H member (pp. 16-20) - This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) the furniture and 2) Documentation is to include a “before” photo with explanation of how the item was refinished must be securely attached.  Examples:  rocker, table, chair or chest. 
900 Old or discarded item made useful in a new way as a home accessory (p. 20) - This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) the accessory and 2) a sheet or folder of documentation.  Documentation is to include a “before” photo; an explanation of how the item was made useful again in a new way; materials used, cost and time involved in project. Examples: old silverware flattened and made into wind chimes; scrap wood pieces made into wall art; old lace doily attached to a pillow or framed; old tool box cleaned up and made into a TV stand.

 

Unit IV EXHIBITS from In My Home project book
901 An accessory for the home, made with member’s original or adapted design – This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) the accessory and 2) a sheet or folder of documentation.  Documentation is to include an explanation of how the item was created/adapted and a description of how and where item is used in the home.  Examples: latch hooked rug or wall hanging; pillow with stitchery design; wall hanging of natural dyed yarns, or drawing with mat and finished or refinished frame.
902 Heritage item refinished, restored, or made by the 4-H member - This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) the item and 2) a sheet or folder of documentation.  Documentation is to include information on the history or meaning of the item to the member, how the item was refinished, restored, or made by the member, and how it is used in the home.  Examples include antique or collectible furniture, memory box, scrapbook that reflects family history/home/house/farm/land of several generations), quilt with heritage design, wall hanging showing family tree. 
903 Purchased article selected by 4-H member to solve a home decorating problem – This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) the purchased article and 2) a folder of documentation.  Documentation is to include a description of the problem to be solved, alternatives considered in the solution of the problem, how the plan was carried out, resources used (time, money) and member's evaluation of the results (satisfaction with purchased article, how article is used in the home), and photos illustrating the before and after effect.  Examples include wall decoration, lamp, vase, storage item, desk accessories, bedspread, rug, table linens, pillow, and draperies.
904 A cloth article made by the 4-H'er showing a major home improvement – This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) the cloth article and 2) a folder of documentation.  Documentation is to include a written description, “before” and “after” pictures /showing how cloth article is used in home, other colors used in room, time and costs involved, and care required. Examples: bedspread, quilt, window treatment and boxed bench pad. Unacceptable: purses, tote bags, backpacks, duffle bags. 
Unit Advanced: Self-Directed Project--the intent of the following classes is to give members an opportunity to put everything they have learned in Units I-IV of the home environment projects into practice.  
905 Furniture Experience—Furniture which has been refinished, reupholstered, recovered, recycled, reused or remodeled - Exhibit is to be made up of two pieces: 1) the piece of furniture and 2) a folder describing the original condition of the furniture (include a picture if possible), work required in completing project, time and cost involved, and how item is used in the home.  DO NOT INCLUDE NEWLY CONSTRUCTED FURNITURE.                                                                

906 Design Experience - Create a plan for or actually complete a design experience.  The exhibit is to be made up of two pieces: 1) a home furnishing item which is representative of the design experience (item may be made by the member or purchased) and 2) a folder or notebook describing the plan.  Examples of project ideas: a plan for redecorating a room; creation of an accessory item using an original design of 4-H member; notebook with pictures and descriptions of architectural styles used in Kentucky homes.
907 Heritage Experience - Complete a heritage project.  The exhibit is to be made up of two pieces: 1) an item representative of the heritage experience and 2) a folder or notebook describing the overall experience, the significance of the project to your family.  Examples of project ideas: Restoration of a family heirloom (could include caning, reseating, etc.) including who it belonged to and the significance to the family; study of furniture styles including pictures and history; study of old buildings in the community including photos and descriptions of the architectural significance, period of history, uses of the buildings; create an item after learning a heritage or craft skill...especially from an older family member or friend  and describe how skill was learned, how interest was stimulated and how you will use item and skill. 
908 Major Home Improvement Experience - Complete a major home improvement project.  The exhibit is to be made up of a notebook which describes the project, tell whether project was an individual project or a group or family project, describe the do-it-yourself skills learned time and cost involved.  Include before, during, and after photographs, if possible.  Examples: improve storage areas in the house or garage; paint the house; wallpaper and decorate a room; remodel the basement.  

 

CHANGING SPACES: 
909 Room Floor Plan. This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) a mounted printout of a room and 2) folder of the documentation described below.  Use the Better Homes and Gardens web site www.bhg.com/decorating/arrange-a-room/ or similar software to draw a room (scale: 1 square = 1 foot).  Include a door(s), window(s), and furniture.  Print in color or black and white (Minimum size 8 ½ x 11 inches. Maximum size 11 x 17 inches).  Mount the printout on mat board or foam core board. Documentation should include answers to these questions: 1. Is the room you have drawn similar to a room in your house? What are its dimensions? How many square feet are in the room?  2. Did you have problems with the web site or software? If so, how did you solve them? 3. Tell about how you worked with the items in your room such as walls, windows, doors and furniture.
910 House Floor Plan.  This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) mounted printout of house plan and 2) folder of the documentation described below.  Use any software program to draw a house plan.  Include bedroom(s), bath(s), living space, kitchen, door(s) and window(s). Including a garage is optional.  Print in color or black and white (Minimum size 8 ½ x 11 inches. Maximum size 11 x 17 inches.). Mount the printout on mat board or foam core board.   Documentation should include answers to these questions: 1. Does your floor plan resemble the house you live in? If not, did you look at other floor plans for inspiration? What type of roof does your house have? 2. Did you consider how a family member who is disabled (for instance, a wheelchair user) might get around in your home? 3. Describe any problems you had with the software and how you solved them. Tell how you worked with additional items required to create a floor plan.
911 Presentation Board – Color Scheme for One Room:  This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) a presentation board as described below and 2) a folder of the documentation described below.  Create a presentation board which illustrates a color scheme for any room in the home.  On mat board or foam board, mount color pictures or actual swatches of fabric, wall covering, paint, and flooring, (Color pictures may be downloaded and printed or cut from magazines to represent these items. The mounting board should be 15” or 16” X 20” inches. In the folder, describe the person who lives in the room and  the decisions required in selecting the color scheme
912 Presentation Board – Floor Plan & Color Scheme for Bedroom:  This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) a presentation board as described below and 2) a folder of the documentation described below.  Create a presentation board which includes a floor plan (with placement of furniture) and color scheme for a bedroom.  Use the Better Homes and Gardens web site www.bhg.com/decorating/arrange-a-room/ or similar software to draw the bedroom (scale: 1 square = 1 foot).  Include a door(s), window(s), and furniture.  Print in color or black and white.  On mat or foam board, mount the floor plan and color pictures or actual swatches of fabric, wall covering, paint, and flooring.  (Color pictures may be downloaded and printed or cut from magazines to represent these items.) The mounting board should be 15” or 16” X 20.” In the folder, describe the person who lives in the room and  the decisions required in selecting the color scheme, flooring, wall, and window treatments; describe the furniture and how the furniture was arranged to accommodate traffic flow; describe the floor, wall, and window treatments selected, etc.; and describe what you like most about the room.
913 Presentation Board – Floor Plan & Color Scheme for Great Room or Family Room:  This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) a presentation board as described below and 2) a folder of the documentation described below. Create a presentation board which includes a room floor plan (with placement of furniture) and color scheme for a great room/family room.  Use the Better Homes and Gardens web site www.bhg.com/decorating/arrange-a-room/ or similar software to draw the room (scale: 1 square = 1 foot).  Include a door(s), window(s), and furniture.  Print in color or black and white.  On mat or foam board, mount the floor plan and color pictures or actual swatches of fabric, wall covering, paint, and flooring.  (Color pictures may be downloaded and printed or cut from magazines to represent these items.) The mounting board should be 15” or 16” X 20.” In the folder, describe the family who uses the room and  the decisions required in selecting the color scheme, flooring, wall, and window treatments; describe the furniture and how the furniture was arranged to accommodate traffic flow; describe the floor, wall, and window treatments selected, etc.; and describe what you like most about the room.